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Burnley 4-6 Spurs!


Guest sheridans_world
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Just watching the highlights, with the score at 0-0, a Spurs player hit a wild 30 yard backpass, which his keeper had to stretch to push over the bar. No comments from the commentator, and no protests from Burnley, but surely the keeper is not allowed to handle the ball from the backpass. If he hadn't handled it, it would have been a goal. Therefore the keeper's deliberate handball to prevent a goal from a backpass should have resulted in a his sending off. Spurs down to 10 men for most of the game and then who knows?

 

Amazing error not spotted by anyone who matters! :pow:

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Just watching the highlights, with the score at 0-0, a Spurs player hit a wild 30 yard backpass, which his keeper had to stretch to push over the bar. No comments from the commentator, and no protests from Burnley, but surely the keeper is not allowed to handle the ball from the backpass. If he hadn't handled it, it would have been a goal. Therefore the keeper's deliberate handball to prevent a goal from a backpass should have resulted in a his sending off. Spurs down to 10 men for most of the game and then who knows?

 

Amazing error not spotted by anyone who matters! :pow:

 

Interesting reading of the rules. I'd suggest it was a free kick and booking <it was spotted by Sky>.

 

 

And if that keeper was off I reckon Spuds would have been through in normal time.

Edited by OldhamSheridan
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Just watching the highlights, with the score at 0-0, a Spurs player hit a wild 30 yard backpass, which his keeper had to stretch to push over the bar. No comments from the commentator, and no protests from Burnley, but surely the keeper is not allowed to handle the ball from the backpass. If he hadn't handled it, it would have been a goal. Therefore the keeper's deliberate handball to prevent a goal from a backpass should have resulted in a his sending off. Spurs down to 10 men for most of the game and then who knows?

 

Amazing error not spotted by anyone who matters! :pow:

 

I thought keepers were allowed to handle it, just not catch it/pick it up.

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Yeah i'm pretty sure that's the rule.

Indirect Free Kick

 

An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper, inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following four offences:

 

-takes more than six seconds while controlling the ball with his hands before releasing it from his possession

-touches the ball again with his hands after it has been released from his possession and has not touched any other player

-touches the ball with his hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him by a team-mate

-touches the ball with his hands after he has received it directly from a throw-in taken by a team-mate

 

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Indirect Free Kick

 

An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper, inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following four offences:

 

-touches the ball with his hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him by a team-mate

 

So I was correct.

 

In this case not only did the keeper touch the ball with his hands, but he also stopped it going in the net. If an outfield player deliberately handles to stop the ball going in the net, it's a penalty and a red card. In the case of the keeper handling, it's an indirect free kick, 10 yards from the goal in this instance, but should the red card had been shown to the keeper?

 

I'm amazed that Burnley didn't protest at the time - a case of showing too much respect to the Greedy League ref employed indirectly by Spurs. If it had happened with Spurs playing at Old Trafford, you can bet the law would have been required to be enforced.

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Burnley:

 

I'll tell you now and I'll tell you firmly

I don't never want to go to Burnley

What they do there don't concern me

Why would anybody make the journey?

 

I'll tell you know and I'll tell you flatly

I don't never want to go to Gatley

I don't even want to go to Batley

Where is that place exactly

 

Do I wanna to go to Redditch?

I wouldn't visit in a souped-up sheddish

what am I some kind of Nebbish?

No I don't want to go to Reddish

 

I'll tell you now and I'll tell you briefley

I don't never want to go to Keighley

I'll tell you now, just like I told Elsa Lanchester...

I don't ever want to go to... Cumbernauld LYRICS © JOHN COOPER CLARKE

 

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Indirect Free Kick

 

An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper, inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following four offences:

 

-takes more than six seconds while controlling the ball with his hands before releasing it from his possession

-touches the ball again with his hands after it has been released from his possession and has not touched any other player

-touches the ball with his hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him by a team-mate

-touches the ball with his hands after he has received it directly from a throw-in taken by a team-mate

 

Those may be the official rules, but how often do we see them enforced to the letter? The 6 second rule in particular is almost wholly redundant these days I'm struggling to think of any instance at all I've seen where a keeper's been penalised for it. As for the back pass rule, I'm sure I've seen many instances where the keeper's palmed the ball away without anyone batting an eyelid, but picking it up was a big no no.

 

In this case not only did the keeper touch the ball with his hands, but he also stopped it going in the net. If an outfield player deliberately handles to stop the ball going in the net, it's a penalty and a red card. In the case of the keeper handling, it's an indirect free kick, 10 yards from the goal in this instance, but should the red card had been shown to the keeper?

 

I'm amazed that Burnley didn't protest at the time - a case of showing too much respect to the Greedy League ref employed indirectly by Spurs. If it had happened with Spurs playing at Old Trafford, you can bet the law would have been required to be enforced.

 

I don't think a red card would be correct even if it was given as an indirect free kick, I think if referees did start doing this then we'd see a lot of keepers being sent off. Think back to Port Vale away last year - their keeper was penalised for diving on a ball that had been deflected towards goal by his own defender (and we scored from the resulting free kick) - should he have been sent off? Technically the ball would have gone in had he not intervened. Similarly what if they pick it up/handle it to prevent interception from an onrushing striker? Is that denying a clear goalscoring opportunity too?

 

As for your final comment about bias towards greedy league opponents, though I agree with your overall sentiment I disagree that this was a case of Burnley showing too much respect or that such an infringement would have been pounced upon by a referee at Old Trafford. As I've said I think these four particular rules are given a wide berth regardless of which teams are affected, and if they were ever enforced properly they'd be given enough debate for people to remember them, but I cannot think of any case where it has happened. If you can find any example of such a thing being penalised, then use it to prove me wrong.

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