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Lancashire Day- Wear your Red Rose with pride!


Diego_Sideburns
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Happy Lancashire Day everyone!

 

On this day in 1295 the first elected representatives from Lancashire were called to Westminster by King Edward I, to attend what later became known as "The Model Parliament".

 

Each year the Lancashire Day proclamation is read out by town criers throughout the County on 27th November:

 

“TO: THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY AND COUNTY

PALATINE OF LANCASTER

 

GREETINGS!

 

Know ye that this day, November 27th in the year of our Lord Two Thousand and eight, the 57th year of the reign of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Duke of Lancaster, is Lancashire Day.

 

Know ye also, and rejoice, that by virtue of Her Majesty's County Palatine of Lancaster, the citizens of the Hundreds of Lonsdale, North and South of the Sands, Amounderness, Leyland, Blackburn, Salford and West Derby are forever entitled to style themselves Lancastrians.

 

Throughout the County Palatine, from the Furness Fells to the River Mersey, from the Irish Sea to the Pennines, this day shall ever mark the peoples' pleasure in that excellent distinction - true Lancastrians, proud of the Red Rose and loyal to our Sovereign Duke.

 

GOD BLESS LANCASHIRE AND GOD SAVE THE QUEEN, DUKE OF LANCASTER.”

 

Do I hear you say that there’s no mention of Oldham?

 

Oldham comprised part of the ‘Salford Hundred’. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 919 AD, Salford had been part of the kingdom of Northumbria, until conquered by Edward the Elder, king of the West Saxons. The Manor (or Hundred) of Salford contained all the lands "between the Ribble and the Mersey", contained nine large parishes, and came under the diocese of Lichfield in matters ecclesiastical. Salford was also mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book of William the Conqueror. It makes reference to Salford as being "held by Rogier de Poitou". The so-called Salford "Hundred" (an Anglo-Saxon word meaning "district"), included most of modern Manchester, as far as Heaton Mersey in the south, Bolton and Bury to the north, Oldham and Rochdale to the east, and Warrington and Wigan to the west.

 

So all those ignoramuses, who say Oldham is part of Manchester, may they wash out their mouths with bleach, and today let’s wear the red rose with pride and celebrate that the people of Oldham have the excellent distinction of being true Lancastrians, and are forever entitled to style themselves as such.

 

This also applies to those born in Oldham and are now living in exile. Of course, the real ‘cool cats with the cream’ are those who were not only born in Oldham, Lancashire, but were born at the hospital known as Boundary Park! :redrose:

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North...of the Sands

This bit gave me an a fair bit of fun against the lass I was seeing for a while who is a fearsomely strong Yorkshireist, and who maintains that her dad is a Cumbrian, whatever one of them might be. I hope he recovers from his denial at some stage :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose:

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This bit gave me an a fair bit of fun against the lass I was seeing for a while who is a fearsomely strong Yorkshireist, and who maintains that her dad is a Cumbrian, whatever one of them might be. I hope he recovers from his denial at some stage :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose: :redrose:

 

It will not have escaped your notice that for ecclesiastical matters, the Salford Hundred was subservient to the Midland stronghold of Lichfield, just up the road from where the monks started brewing that world renowned ale, with its various by-products being spread thinly and warming football fans for ages. :redrose:

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i hope its lancashire hot pot with red cabbage

 

At Burnley in the League Cup game last year, we sat in the Sponsors Lounge and had Lancashire Hot Pot with red cabbage - it was delicious... absolutely gorgeous. We also had our pic took with Hughesy (just signed the day before I think) outside the players tunnel.... and our table of 8 Latics fans got the full attention of Burnley legend (ha ha) David Eyres for almost the entire after-game sponsors lounge shenanigans.

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Happy Lancashire Day everyone!

 

On this day in 1295 the first elected representatives from Lancashire were called to Westminster by King Edward I, to attend what later became known as "The Model Parliament".

 

Each year the Lancashire Day proclamation is read out by town criers throughout the County on 27th November:

 

“TO: THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY AND COUNTY

PALATINE OF LANCASTER

 

GREETINGS!

 

Know ye that this day, November 27th in the year of our Lord Two Thousand and eight, the 57th year of the reign of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Duke of Lancaster, is Lancashire Day.

 

Know ye also, and rejoice, that by virtue of Her Majesty's County Palatine of Lancaster, the citizens of the Hundreds of Lonsdale, North and South of the Sands, Amounderness, Leyland, Blackburn, Salford and West Derby are forever entitled to style themselves Lancastrians.

 

Throughout the County Palatine, from the Furness Fells to the River Mersey, from the Irish Sea to the Pennines, this day shall ever mark the peoples' pleasure in that excellent distinction - true Lancastrians, proud of the Red Rose and loyal to our Sovereign Duke.

 

GOD BLESS LANCASHIRE AND GOD SAVE THE QUEEN, DUKE OF LANCASTER.”

 

Do I hear you say that there’s no mention of Oldham?

 

Oldham comprised part of the ‘Salford Hundred’. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 919 AD, Salford had been part of the kingdom of Northumbria, until conquered by Edward the Elder, king of the West Saxons. The Manor (or Hundred) of Salford contained all the lands "between the Ribble and the Mersey", contained nine large parishes, and came under the diocese of Lichfield in matters ecclesiastical. Salford was also mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book of William the Conqueror. It makes reference to Salford as being "held by Rogier de Poitou". The so-called Salford "Hundred" (an Anglo-Saxon word meaning "district"), included most of modern Manchester, as far as Heaton Mersey in the south, Bolton and Bury to the north, Oldham and Rochdale to the east, and Warrington and Wigan to the west.

 

So all those ignoramuses, who say Oldham is part of Manchester, may they wash out their mouths with bleach, and today let’s wear the red rose with pride and celebrate that the people of Oldham have the excellent distinction of being true Lancastrians, and are forever entitled to style themselves as such.

 

This also applies to those born in Oldham and are now living in exile. Of course, the real ‘cool cats with the cream’ are those who were not only born in Oldham, Lancashire, but were born at the hospital known as Boundary Park! :redrose:

 

Nice bit o' 'istory that. Thanks for bringing it up.

 

Cheers,

 

KC

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