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leeslover
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This should explain why there's nothing personal when OASIS members refuse to shake hands with INSANE :sick01:

 

Faecal bacteria join the commute

 

Commuters in the north were dirtier than in the south

More than one in four commuters has bacteria from faeces on their hands, an investigation suggests.

 

Scientists from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine swabbed 409 people at bus and train stations in five major cities in England and Wales.

 

The further north they went, the more often they found commuters with faecal bacteria on their hands - men in Newcastle were the worst offenders.

 

Experts stressed the importance of hand hygiene for preventing illness.

 

The bacteria found suggested people were not washing their hands properly after using the toilet, said the researchers.

 

Toilet hands

 

In Newcastle and Liverpool, men were more likely than women to show contamination - 53% of men compared with 30% of women in Newcastle and 36% of men compared with 31% of women in Liverpool. We were flabbergasted by the finding that so many people had faecal bugs on their hands

 

Dr Val Curtis, director of the Hygiene Centre at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

 

In the other three cities - London, Cardiff and Birmingham - the women's hands were dirtier.

 

People who had used the bus had higher rates of hand contamination than those who had used the train.

 

Manual workers had cleaner hands than other professionals, students, retired people or the unemployed.

 

Dr Val Curtis, director of the Hygiene Centre at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said: "We were flabbergasted by the finding that so many people had faecal bugs on their hands.

 

"The figures were far higher than we had anticipated, and suggest that there is a real problem with people washing their hands in the UK. DIRTY HANDS

 

Newcastle - men 53%, women 30%

Liverpool - men 36%, women 31%

Birmingham - men 21%, women 26%

Cardiff - men 15%, women 29%

Euston (London) - men 6%, women 21%

 

"If any of these people had been suffering from a diarrhoeal disease, the potential for it to be passed around would be greatly increased by their failure to wash their hands after going to the toilet."

 

Professor Mike Catchpole, director of the Health Protection Agency's Centre for Infections, said: "These results are startling and should be enough to make anyone reach for the soap.

 

"It is well known that hand washing is one of the most important ways of controlling the spread of infections, especially those that cause diarrhoea and vomiting, colds and flu.

 

"People should always wash their hands after using the toilet, before eating or handling food, and after handling animals. And remember to cover all cuts and scratches with a waterproof dressing."

 

Winter vomiting

 

The HPA's monitoring of infections over recent weeks suggests that cases of norovirus - the winter vomiting bug - are rising and that the annual norovirus season is likely to have begun.

 

Norovirus is the most common cause of gastrointestinal disease in the UK with peak activity in terms of numbers of cases and outbreaks during the winter months, from October to March.

 

It has been estimated that between 600,000 and a million people in the UK are affected each year.

 

Professor Catchpole said: "Norovirus is highly infectious and easily spread in settings where people are in close contact with one another so good hygiene, including frequent handwashing, is really important."

 

The study was part of the world's first Global Handwashing Day, dedicated to raising awareness about the importance hand hygiene plays in public health.

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As one of the few members of INSANE left I'll point out that the only place I use public transport is London. Everywhere else it is full of scrotes that my snobbery keeps me well away from. I drink heavily before doing this so I can handle it. I therefore count myself as exempt from these dirty people.

 

Not to say that I don't wipe my arse with no bog roll and then rub it into my hands as fake tan though.

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Oh wow they went round 409 people spread over 5 cities, that's on average 80 people per city (not exactly huge numbers). Did they check where the people were from, after all this was done in train/bus stations, did they vary the times they did it or vary the days. After all if they had gone to Newcastle on a sunday just before a train to Scotland was departing I'm sure they'd have found some men with fecal matter on their hands (just find the nearest stag party and swab all of them). Vice-a-versa if they were in Euston on a Monday mid-morning when the place is full of higher social class people I'm sure you won't find too many of them with fecal matter on their hands. This is another BS research project done by :censored: in London (and some of them will know my Dad), where conincidentally London comes out best. As another member of INSANE you won't have to worry about me as I can almost guarantee I wash my hands more times than anyone else on here (and I've been taught how to wash them so I do it properly). I could go on picking holes in this piece of research but all that it shows us is not everyone washes their hands when they should (but that's somehting we knew already).

 

BTW I wonder what % of people at the London Tropical School have fecal matter on their hands.

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Oh wow they went round 409 people spread over 5 cities, that's on average 80 people per city (not exactly huge numbers). Did they check where the people were from, after all this was done in train/bus stations, did they vary the times they did it or vary the days. After all if they had gone to Newcastle on a sunday just before a train to Scotland was departing I'm sure they'd have found some men with fecal matter on their hands (just find the nearest stag party and swab all of them). Vice-a-versa if they were in Euston on a Monday mid-morning when the place is full of higher social class people I'm sure you won't find too many of them with fecal matter on their hands. This is another BS research project done by :censored: in London (and some of them will know my Dad), where conincidentally London comes out best. As another member of INSANE you won't have to worry about me as I can almost guarantee I wash my hands more times than anyone else on here (and I've been taught how to wash them so I do it properly). I could go on picking holes in this piece of research but all that it shows us is not everyone washes their hands when they should (but that's somehting we knew already).

 

BTW I wonder what % of people at the London Tropical School have fecal matter on their hands.

I refer the honourable medical student to the third post on this thread, which does after all refer to gentlemen from Newcastle written about by their countrymen. I actually know several people in London who have reacted the other way and are scared to touch anything for fear they will catch ebola or something from grabbing a hand rail on the Tube. The worst one of them actually carries hygienic wipes in his shirt pocket in case of such an event or for when he goes for number ones, as he doesn't like to touch the tap in the gents. Still, what a few of us always suspected about him was confirmed when we found out that he'd got an acquaintance to rear-end him in front of the TV whilst Eurovision was on.

 

Midlander, by the way.

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Midlander, by the way.

 

I thought we'd come out of this almost unscathed......so far!

 

Scientists have now discovered that the gel in use in hospitals for staff. patients and visitors to wash hands before and after entering wards is ineffective against the Norovirus. Research shows that the solution to combat this virus is.......

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

soap and water!

 

As Iain Dowie said, it's not rocket science and he knew all about that!

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I refer the honourable medical student to the third post on this thread, which does after all refer to gentlemen from Newcastle written about by their countrymen. I actually know several people in London who have reacted the other way and are scared to touch anything for fear they will catch ebola or something from grabbing a hand rail on the Tube. The worst one of them actually carries hygienic wipes in his shirt pocket in case of such an event or for when he goes for number ones, as he doesn't like to touch the tap in the gents. Still, what a few of us always suspected about him was confirmed when we found out that he'd got an acquaintance to rear-end him in front of the TV whilst Eurovision was on.

 

Midlander, by the way.

 

Now don't get me wrong I'm not saying that North-East gentlemen are paragons of virtue and hygeine I was just pointing out the obvious flaws in the piece of research which will have probably made the results more significant than they were. Your friend is right though the amount of germs (though Ebola is unlikely) on the hand rails on the tube is probably ridiculous. I'm sure there was a study where the same place swabbed the tube and other cities' public transport systems and the tube was the dirtiest. Where traces of fecal matter, sperm, urine, blood, pus, various germs and vomit (plus other bodily fluids) were found on areas regularly and routinely touched by the public. In fact the dirtiest place you touch is probably the fixtures in toilets and I'm surprised in this day and age why if hand washing is so vital for public cleanliness that more automatic wash basins etc. aren't used (although my Dad actually found out why there aren't more automatic hand-dryers as opposed to paper towels in hospitals and it was a heat issue). Although to go to the extent of carrying handy-wipes is actually probably doing him more harm than good as research has suggested that those people who are over studious about hygeine have more health problems than those who follow good practice.

 

Oh and BTW the man who discovered the importance of washing hands in this country was a Teessider who was practising in south London.

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Now don't get me wrong I'm not saying that North-East gentlemen are paragons of virtue and hygeine I was just pointing out the obvious flaws in the piece of research which will have probably made the results more significant than they were. Your friend is right though the amount of germs (though Ebola is unlikely) on the hand rails on the tube is probably ridiculous. I'm sure there was a study where the same place swabbed the tube and other cities' public transport systems and the tube was the dirtiest. Where traces of fecal matter, sperm, urine, blood, pus, various germs and vomit (plus other bodily fluids) were found on areas regularly and routinely touched by the public. In fact the dirtiest place you touch is probably the fixtures in toilets and I'm surprised in this day and age why if hand washing is so vital for public cleanliness that more automatic wash basins etc. aren't used (although my Dad actually found out why there aren't more automatic hand-dryers as opposed to paper towels in hospitals and it was a heat issue). Although to go to the extent of carrying handy-wipes is actually probably doing him more harm than good as research has suggested that those people who are over studious about hygeine have more health problems than those who follow good practice.

 

Oh and BTW the man who discovered the importance of washing hands in this country was a Teessider who was practising in south London.

Personally I'm all in favour of that handwashing thing, and I take care not to do things like eating nuts out of bowls in pub bars, as it's too few steps away from the smelly unwashed Dr Johnsons of the locals who you see not washing their hands, but to start fretting about touching things that are all around you every day is IMO taking it too far - it's the sort of fear that has (I believe?) led to a generation of kids who grow up barely exposed to a single germ and wonder why they aren't healthy.

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Scientists have now discovered that the gel in use in hospitals for staff. patients and visitors to wash hands before and after entering wards is ineffective against the Norovirus. Research shows that the solution to combat this virus is.......

soap and water!

 

This is true that alcohol hand gels aren't effective against things like norovirus and C. Diff and soap and water should be used. But if a ward has a norovirus problem you might find the alcohol hand gels are taken off the walls and people are encouraged to use soap and water instead (which is the right thing to do). The alcohol gel is not liked by those with sensitive skin as well. Hygeine in hospitals is one of my pet-peeves actually and I've been saying for a while (and my Dad for even longer) about some of the simple measures they could use to improve hygeine and the removal of ties is one (took them a while to actually do it though) as is getting rid of carpet; as carpet is very difficult to clean properly and helps spread norovirus is improperly cleaned (to clean it properly you have to throw it out). But a lot of places used in health care still have carpet (if you can make something easy to clean but still inviting and soft enough so that kids can fall with some impunity you'd make a fortune). Hygeine isn't just about using the hand wash facilites availible (and many members of the public don't- and I'm not senior enough to tell them off but those that are don't) you have to use them properly. Here's a video which shows you how to do it.

 

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofNursi...handwashing.htm

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My parents taught me and they have never been to Teeside or practised in south London.

 

Stop being faceious, the doctor that discovered the importance of hand washing in terms of stopping spreading disease was Victorian and it was his 'discovery' that got the process into good practice which your parents then followed and educated you on.

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Personally I'm all in favour of that handwashing thing, and I take care not to do things like eating nuts out of bowls in pub bars, as it's too few steps away from the smelly unwashed Dr Johnsons of the locals who you see not washing their hands, but to start fretting about touching things that are all around you every day is IMO taking it too far - it's the sort of fear that has (I believe?) led to a generation of kids who grow up barely exposed to a single germ and wonder why they aren't healthy.

 

I don't eat nuts anyway but I'm surprised nuts are still served in bowls since it is known what sort of things are in the bowl. Some of the increase in things like asthma in recent years has been put down to kids not being exposed to ordinary run of the mill germs by over studios parents who clean everything too much and there is research to back this up.

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Also the sight of operating theatre staff wearing gowns in public areas and when using staff catering facilities does not inspire public confidence.

 

That's not supposed to go on (anymore) and if you feel it necessary you should report it (I suggest in writing to your local Hospital trust Chief executive would be a good place to start). Although technically if they were wearing the gowns and then got changed it might be OK.

 

BTW I don't do this but I don't spend all my time in scrubs, but I'm aware that some people are wearing inappropriate clothing for what they are doing (in terms of hygeine) yet I don't like reporting them as they are usually a lot more senior than me and it doesn't help to become liked.

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Although technically if they were wearing the gowns and then got changed it might be OK.

In what sense can it be OK to go into a place where communal food is being served, putting your hands into cutlery draws and so on whilst wearing the gown that you were wearing in a place fill of blood and guts, or at the least infectious people who you were touching?

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That's not supposed to go on (anymore) and if you feel it necessary you should report it (I suggest in writing to your local Hospital trust Chief executive would be a good place to start). Although technically if they were wearing the gowns and then got changed it might be OK.

 

BTW I don't do this but I don't spend all my time in scrubs, but I'm aware that some people are wearing inappropriate clothing for what they are doing (in terms of hygeine) yet I don't like reporting them as they are usually a lot more senior than me and it doesn't help to become liked.

 

Regardless of how many times it is brought to the attention of the local hospital trust, unfortunately it's human nature for the public and health professionals, even though the latter should know better, to be lazy when it comes to strict hygiene procedures

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In what sense can it be OK to go into a place where communal food is being served, putting your hands into cutlery draws and so on whilst wearing the gown that you were wearing in a place fill of blood and guts, or at the least infectious people who you were touching?

 

Hospital gowns are only to be worn in surgical theatres they are sterile on the outside and cover the body and are thrown away after use so no-one should see these on anyone unless its in theatre. Scrubs (i.e the standard pyjama type efforts seen on shows like scrubs) are worn underneath said gowns when operating and are clean when put on and are worn if the person is going into theatre (usually those people that are forever going in and out of theatre or might need to go into theatre in a hurry wear them throughout the day) or if the person runs the risk of getting their clothes dirty so wants to keep them clean. These shouldn't be worn in canteens due to patient safety (i.e. infection control for high risk patients) but I will accept your point about the clothes affecting food as well (but I would argue the clothes worn by other people i.e. doctors in suits etc. (and I include patients and visitors in that too) probably aren't as clean as they should be). In terms of touching people well health care staff should wash their hands (with soap and water) before going into any canteen so their hands should be clean. Ideally all health care staff should wear colour coded scrubs (for profession) and then epulets to denote seniority and these should only be worn on wards or travelling to and from different wards and should never be worn in canteens and I think the NHS will go this way before I leave it.

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Regardless of how many times it is brought to the attention of the local hospital trust, unfortunately it's human nature for the public and health professionals, even though the latter should know better, to be lazy when it comes to strict hygiene procedures

 

I entirely agree (although if you only have 15 minutes to grab a bite to eat you would be annoyed if you had to spend 10 minutes getting changed- I'm not excusing the behaviour of my colleagues I'm giving the excuse they might use). If people were so inclined and had the time on their hands a day spent in a hospital cafeteria taking pictures (not using your mobile phone) of everyone wearing scrubs (or worse gowns) who comes in might make those responsible (both in terms of the wearing and disciplining those breaking policy) think more about it.

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